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"Se"+indirect object+verb+direct object: Accidental grammar

Se te acabó el tiempo, Milagros
[Caption 34, Muñeca Brava > Pilot > 8]

Is there anything scarier than finding an angry nun in your room late at night? In this installment of Muñeca Brava, our heroine Milagros encounters a stern Mother Superior back in her room at the orphanage after sneaking out for some night-clubbing. The nun disregards the girl’s flimsy excuses and says ominously: "Se te acabó el tiempo, Milagros."

-The declaration means: “You’ve run out of time, Milagros.” But if you look at the construction “se te acabó -from the reflexive verb acabársele (to run out of)- it more literally means “Time has run out on you.”

We find something similar going on in caption 17 of Taimur Talks.

esos se me echaron a perder...
[Caption 17, taimur > Taimur Talks]

Our friend-for-life Taimur is tellling us "those got destroyed (on me)" or "those got wrecked (on me)." Like the good monja above, he might have put the subject last, had he wanted to: Se me echaron a perder mis cosas ("My things got wrecked").

These are examples of a special se construction used to describe unplanned or accidental occurences in Spanish. As a rule, the se + me, te, le, les or nos (indirect object) + verb construction describes occurrences that happen "to someone" (a alguien). The verb agrees with what in English is the thing acted upon (the direct object) because in Spanish that thing becomes the subject, that which is doing the action. No need to get mired in grammar, just have a look at these other examples and it should start to soak in.

Se nos está acabando el pan. (acabársele)
"We’re running out of bread. / The bread is running out on us."

Se me rompieron los anteojos. (rompérsele)
"I (accidently) broke my glasses. / My glasses broke on me."

De repente, a Pablo se le ocurrió una idea. (ocurrírsele)
"
Suddenly, an idea ocurred to Pablo.
"

Grammar

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